Category Archives: China

The death of a young chef sparks protests in Shishou City

The death of a young man in the Hubei Province of China is sparking protests. As many as 70,000 people have barred the police from removing the body of a young man who fell to his death from a third floor at a local hotel in Shishou City.
The public has been protesting what they believe is governmental corruption, torture and murder.

On June 17 the young man’s body was found in front of the Yonglong Grand Hotel’s entrance. On June 20 a Public Security Office released a statement about the incident.

The dead man is Tu Yuangao, a chef, who had left behind a suicide letter. The preliminary medical exam found no other fatal wounds on the body and ruled out murder. The family rejected attempts by the police to remove the body for an autopsy.

Eyewitnesses report that they saw no blood on the ground but did see blood clots around the man’s mouth, nose and ears. They also reported that the lower body of the man showed signs of severe torture.

The family was offered $5,200 on June 18 as compensation if they confirmed that their relative had indeed committed suicide. They were told if they did not the body would be taken away by force and cremated that evening.

The father of Tu Yuangao, 24, refused the offer. He said that he had cans of chemicals and that he would kill himself and anyone else who attempted to seize his son’s body.

By June 19 there were 2,000 people who had gathered around the hotel to help the father’s desire that the authorities not remove the body. The entrance to the hotel had been blocked to prevent the police to enter. Over a dozen people were beaten and taken to a detention center without receiving medical treatment.

Chinese media goes against these reports saying that there were no injuries during the protest.

China Daily reports:

“A handful of people have been detained, but I don’t know if they will be charged or given detention,” an official from Jingzhou publicity office surnamed Xiong, said yesterday.

That only served to fuel the anger of the people.

Radio Free Asia reports:

“We believe this may relate to some kind of illegal activities and drug issues going on in the hotel that resulted in the deaths of certain people. There have already been five mysterious homicide cases at the hotel, but only two cases have been solved,” Huang, one of the protesters said.

By that afternoon there were as many as 40,000 people on the streets near the hotel. The protesters were said to be throwing bricks and bottles at the police.

By early evening riot police had arrived on the scene using water hoses on the crowds. The crowd instead of leaving destroyed the fire trucks supplying the water. The riot police then used tear gas on the crowd.

On June 20 China’s media Xinhua released a report titled Many Departments in Hubei’s Shishou City Jointly Organized a Fire Drill for Vehicle Fires.

Bloggers reports on the incident from within China were removed by the government.

According to those that reside in Shishou there have been at least two other mysterious deaths at the same hotel. One took place in 1999 and the other in 2007.

Those in the city say that the hotel is a hotbed of criminal activity. It is believed that the young chef knew of secrets and those secrets cost him his life.

There are reports that the body of Tu Yuangao has been removed by the police but there is no confirmation on this report.

Radio Free Asia reports:

“A lot of armed police came and took the body away,” another protester said. “They detained a few people as well.”

“They persuaded the family to let it go after they agreed to go through a formal autopsy. We were just watching from the outside. At one point there were around 10,000 of us,” he said.

Shanghai Daily reports that the body was cremated at 4am and a funeral was held around 9:30am on Thursday.

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The death of a young chef sparks protests in Shishou City

The death of a young man in the Hubei Province of China is sparking protests. As many as 70,000 people have barred the police from removing the body of a young man who fell to his death from a third floor at a local hotel in Shishou City.
The public has been protesting what they believe is governmental corruption, torture and murder.

On June 17 the young man’s body was found in front of the Yonglong Grand Hotel’s entrance. On June 20 a Public Security Office released a statement about the incident.

The dead man is Tu Yuangao, a chef, who had left behind a suicide letter. The preliminary medical exam found no other fatal wounds on the body and ruled out murder. The family rejected attempts by the police to remove the body for an autopsy.

Eyewitnesses report that they saw no blood on the ground but did see blood clots around the man’s mouth, nose and ears. They also reported that the lower body of the man showed signs of severe torture.

The family was offered $5,200 on June 18 as compensation if they confirmed that their relative had indeed committed suicide. They were told if they did not the body would be taken away by force and cremated that evening.

The father of Tu Yuangao, 24, refused the offer. He said that he had cans of chemicals and that he would kill himself and anyone else who attempted to seize his son’s body.

By June 19 there were 2,000 people who had gathered around the hotel to help the father’s desire that the authorities not remove the body. The entrance to the hotel had been blocked to prevent the police to enter. Over a dozen people were beaten and taken to a detention center without receiving medical treatment.

Chinese media goes against these reports saying that there were no injuries during the protest.

China Daily reports:

“A handful of people have been detained, but I don’t know if they will be charged or given detention,” an official from Jingzhou publicity office surnamed Xiong, said yesterday.

That only served to fuel the anger of the people.

Radio Free Asia reports:

“We believe this may relate to some kind of illegal activities and drug issues going on in the hotel that resulted in the deaths of certain people. There have already been five mysterious homicide cases at the hotel, but only two cases have been solved,” Huang, one of the protesters said.

By that afternoon there were as many as 40,000 people on the streets near the hotel. The protesters were said to be throwing bricks and bottles at the police.

By early evening riot police had arrived on the scene using water hoses on the crowds. The crowd instead of leaving destroyed the fire trucks supplying the water. The riot police then used tear gas on the crowd.

On June 20 China’s media Xinhua released a report titled Many Departments in Hubei’s Shishou City Jointly Organized a Fire Drill for Vehicle Fires.

Bloggers reports on the incident from within China were removed by the government.

According to those that reside in Shishou there have been at least two other mysterious deaths at the same hotel. One took place in 1999 and the other in 2007.

Those in the city say that the hotel is a hotbed of criminal activity. It is believed that the young chef knew of secrets and those secrets cost him his life.

There are reports that the body of Tu Yuangao has been removed by the police but there is no confirmation on this report.

Radio Free Asia reports:

“A lot of armed police came and took the body away,” another protester said. “They detained a few people as well.”

“They persuaded the family to let it go after they agreed to go through a formal autopsy. We were just watching from the outside. At one point there were around 10,000 of us,” he said.

Shanghai Daily reports that the body was cremated at 4am and a funeral was held around 9:30am on Thursday.


China Launches English Language ‘Global Times”

China is launching an English language newspaper on Monday to push their party line in the international media arena. The paper will run five days a week.
The paper is said to be a new mouthpiece for the Chinese government using the English language. The Global Times will cover world news from the Chinese perspective according to the official Xinhua News Agency.

The editor in chief, Hu Xijin says that the goal of the newspaper is “to make friends with foreigners and to facilitate communication between China and the world.”

The Global Times will be published by the party mouthpiece People’s Daily. It is directly controlled by the Central Committee. Xinhua is controlled by the Cabinet.

The Global Times joins the Chinese version that focuses on international news. It begun in 1993. The English paper will also have a website that launches on Monday as well. The paper will be printed Monday through Friday.

Xinhua Net reports:

“It marks a new beginning for the Global Times,” said Hu Xijin, the Editor-in-Chief of the Global Times. “The world of English language was new to us. But with the launch of the Global Times English edition, we have gained confidence to make it a success, to make friends with foreigners and to facilitate communication between China and the world.”


Sex Ratio In China As Boys Outnumber Girls By 35 Million

China is in a crisis with over 32 million more boys born than girls. A new report is showing that China will continue to see the high differences in sex ratio worsen even more over the next twenty years.
The report was published online by the British Medical Journal.

At this point China can not escape its fate of a failed “one-child” policy. Parents who defy the law have to pay fines and pay a steep price for their children’s education.

Because of the shortages some of the provinces do allow a second child if the first is a girl or if the parents are having a ‘hardship.’

World Net Daily reports:

“If you’ve got highly sexed young men, there is a concern that they will all get together and, with high levels of testosterone, there may be a real risk, that they will go out and commit crimes,” said Hesketh, a lecturer at University College in London.

It is routine for Chinese families to opt for abortion when they find that they are expecting a girl. Chinese mothers have early access to ultrasound diagnostics and abortion. China’s laws do not expressly prohibit or even define late-term termination. That infanticide while illegal is speculated to be in the hundreds of millions. Families who want a son will abandon their infant daughters on the side of the road to die. There have been reports that some families will even go to the black market to buy a child that at times has been stolen.

The average number of children in Chinese families has fallen from 5.9 to 1.7 during the past forty years.

In 2005 alone China had more than 1.1 million excess male births according to the authors of the report Zhejiang university professors Wei Xing Zhu and Li Lu and Therese Hesketh of University College London/

“This large reduction in the fertility rate, whether by choice or by coercion, has inevitably increased the male to female ratio because of the preference for sons and the availability of contraception and sex selective measures.”

Because of the huge sex ratio millions of men will not be able to find a partner. The review assessed the populations in all 2,861 of China’s counties.

“Overall sex ratios were high across all age groups and residency types, but they were highest in the 1-4 years age group, peaking at 126 … in rural areas. Six provinces had sex ratios of over 130 in the 1-4 age group. The sex ratio at birth was close to normal for first order births but rose steeply for second order births, especially in rural areas, where it reached 146 (143 to 149). Nine provinces had ratios of over 160 for second order births,” the report said.

“Sex selective abortion accounts for almost all the excess males,” it said.

There have been reports that the shortage of women has already made an impact on crime in China. Many Chinese men are buying foreign wives according to the World Health Organization. The going price for Burmese women is between $600 and $2,400.

Because the low chance of being able to find a partner future males in the Chinese society may lead to antisocial behavior and violence, threatening societal stability and security.

While females will be able to ‘marry up’ from their social standing males in lower socio-economic situations will be less likely to find a mate.
Because of this it there will likely be an increased rate of violence in play against females.

Females could become even more of a commodity where there value will be controlled by the males in their families.

South Korea had the same problem in 1992. That year they had a 229-to-100 gender imbalance. The nation quickly used a public-awareness campaign and enforced laws on general selection. The policy appears to have worked, in 2004 the gender balance had righted itself out to 110 male births to 100 female.


In China Capital Punishment Comes In A Van

Last year 1,715 people were put to death by execution in China last year. This year estimates put the death count at nearly 10,000. What happens after a person is killed could be considered criminal. Organs are harvested and sold to the highest bidder.
When Jiang Yong, a corrupt city planner is put to death this year it will not be behind bars. He can expect to die in a white van while lethal drugs course through his veins. It is possible to be sentenced to death for anyone of 68 crimes in China.

Jiang Yong is one of those who will soon have organs used by others if he doesn’t win an appeal.

See Yong, a large man with glasses, had a mistress who he enjoyed showering with gifts. Madame Tang must have been given quite a few nice baubles since Yong took more than £1 million in brides from shady entrepreneurs who wanted protected land to build on.

Yong got caught with his hand in the cookie jar by the Chinese authorities last year. He confessed his crimes and was given a death sentence. He was one of the many that face the same fate.

It’s not hard to be sentenced to death in China. Crimes ranging from fraud to tax evasion can be enough to put a needle in a person’s arm.

Jinguan Auto, a Chinese automaker, produced the white vans that on the outside look like standard police vans. The vans cost £60,000. The insides of the vans though differ vastly from the other law enforcement vehicles. They are speed from one site to another at 80 mph. The vans save money for the government. No building is needed to carry out the organ harvests. The van is able to whip on over to local jails to execute locally in the very community that criminals broke the laws.

All of the deaths are videotaped so that they comply to the strict rules that the government has laid out.

The Daily Mail reports:

‘We have not sold our execution cars to foreign countries yet,’ beamed a proud spokesman. But if they need one, they could contact our company directly.’

When it is time for a prisoner to walk the long green mile they are placed on a automated stretcher and moves into the inside of the van already set up as a sterile operating chamber. Inside the doctors administer drugs that will quickly kill their ‘patient’ and then harvest the prisoner’s eyes, kidney, liver, pancreas and lungs. The heart though can not be used as it has been damaged by the drugs that killed the prisoners.

The vans are being compared to the gas wagons that Nazis used to kill millions.

The program started three years ago and then quieted down last summer as not to offend the human rights groups during the Olympic Games held in Beijing.

The games are over and the vans are back in business.

All of the deaths are videotaped so that they comply to the strict rules that the government has laid out.

Chinese hospitals perform up to 20,000 organ transplants a year. A typical kidney transplant costs £5,000 but that price can rapidly increase if the patient has the money to request an organ quickly.

China used to kill their prisoners by firing squad and then dig out the lethal bullet to charge the family with. It seems that day when family members were asked to pay for the bullet that killed their loved one is gone in China. The organ train is a high payer and those who are in the wrong get to fund the money wagon.


Lost Radioactive Nugget Found In China

Last week a radioactive nugget was lost in China during the demolition of a cement plant in Tongchuan city in Shaanxi province. The lead ball was found in the mill on Friday.
The piece that was missing was a radioactive nuclear scale that is used in making precise measurements. That little nugget contains Caesium-137. The isotope’s radiation can do a lot of damage to the human body if in the wrong hands. It is capable of destroying the nervous system, causing infertility and possible death.

AP reports:

“The production facilities were auctioned to a company called Sichuan Kangna. The company staff mistook the scale for steel scraps and sold it,” Quinling Cement official Mr. Gao said.

The nugget was lost as the walls to a 53-year-old building came tumbling down Monday. Shaanxi Qinling Cement Co. had been auctioned off to Sichuan Kangna. The provincial environment protection department believes that the ball was mistakenly sold as scrap metal.

Experts scoured metal scrap yards and steel mills in pursuit of the radioactive material during the week.
When the radioactive material was located at Xingbao Steel and Iron Co. Ltd in Weinan City on Friday inspectors found high levels of radioactivity around a smelter and steel slags. The ball itself had been melted at the plant.

The contaminated smelter and steel slags are being cleaned so that they will not threaten the environment.

Nuclear Power Daily reports:

Wang Xuhui, a researcher at the Xian-based Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, said the plant’s products were safe, while most of the radioactive element had been mixed in the slags.


China Plans Blacklist For Journalists By End Of The Year

According to the Huffington Post China is planning on creating a blacklist of journalists. Those journalist are the ones that break the strict Chinese rules for media.
The announcement was made last Friday according to a report in the China Press and Publishing Journal. The agency controls state-owned Chinese media and plans to have a database of media professionals who have broken the rules up within the year.

Journalists that appear on the blacklist will have their press cards taken away. They will be restricted from news reporting and editing news material.

China is well known for controlling what is reported in the media. During the summer games in Beijing some of the rules were temporarily relaxed. That policy has gone with the Olympic flame. Journalists in China are imprisoned when reporting about corruption in the private sector or in the government.

The national database is just one of the means that the government has planned to supervise news coverage according to Li Dongdong, deputy director of the General Administration of Press and Publication. There will also be tightened reviews for press credentials and standardized qualifications for editors of newspapers and magazines.

These measures will not apply to outside journalists. Chinese citizens are forbidden to work as journalist for foreign media organizations.